Monday, January 9, 2017

Help Advance Rheumatoid Arthritis Research

This post is sponsored by Acurian, a world leader in connecting people to local research studies.

It’s been more than eight years since my rheumatoid arthritis (RA) diagnosis, and today I’m very happy to have a treatment plan that is working well for me. It was a long and arduous process for me to get to this point, requiring me to try many medications including four different biologics. But, as difficult as it was for me to find a working treatment, none of it would have been possible at all without medical research.

While I’ve been personally lucky to find a working treatment, I know that is not the case for everyone living with RA – which is why continuing research is so important. Research studies are necessary for developing future treatment options, but research studies need volunteers in order to move forward.

Right now, rheumatologists are looking for people with RA to volunteer for local research studies. If you or a loved one have RA and have tried other treatments without success, joining a research study might be a good option to consider. Those who qualify may receive*

·       Payment, which varies by study, up to $625
·       No-cost study-related care from local doctors and specialists
·       No-cost study medication

To see if you qualify for a local RA research study, please visit: www.RAHealthandYou.com

In addition to the above benefits, you will also be helping to advance research for everyone living with RA. The more data that doctors and scientists have, the better treatment options can be developed. That’s the reason I joined a research study myself when I was pregnant with my second baby – so that future moms with RA would have better data and better options than I did. If we can continue to advance research, hopefully doctors and scientists can develop better treatment options for those of us living with RA.  

*In a clinical research study, the participants may receive investigational study product or may receive an inactive substance, or placebo, depending on the study design. Participants receive study-related care from a doctor/research team for the duration of the study. Reasonable payments will be made for participation and the length of the study may vary.

1 comment:

Rick said...

Unfortunately, I believe that diabetes and some heart issues kept me from qualifying. Us old farts are sometimes tough to match with research.